Back To The Future: High School Edition

Cate Hollingsworth, voices editor

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Picture this: it’s twenty years into the future and the class of 2036 is graduating. You are visiting a high school and you walk into a junior history class as the students are finishing second period. Every student is wearing weird, tinted glasses and the desks seem to be giant iPads with legs.

Everything has changed since you were in high school. Class doesn’t start until later and education has come to incorporate everything new technology has to offer.

Discoveries in the biology of the teenage brain persuaded schools to start at later times. During puberty in most mammals, sleep timing in the brain is delayed. This is why teenagers don’t get tired until later.

With new technology such as augmented reality glasses, that integrate reality and projected images, students can manipulate imaginary 3D objects and even perform virtual science experiments.

In this particular history class, students are virtually sitting at the writing of the Declaration of Independence in Independence Hall and taking notes on their iPad desks. The students are only able to hear and see in the virtual world, so any questions they have must be addressed by the teacher.

After the virtual field trip the teacher leads a class discussion. Surprisingly, compare and contrast charts are immortal, and even with all the new improvements they are still being used 20 years later.

The charts are filled out, the students save their work and send it to the teacher for grading. Grading is fast and much more efficient with online assigning and quick communication. The teacher can quickly answer any questions and supply the students with extra help.

The students are only given a few review questions for homework that they will fill out in their online notebooks, and at any time they can play games or take practice tests to review the information.

The psychological discoveries also help inform teachers that the best way for students to retain information is through quick homework reviews. Students no longer stay up late finishing homework, and they are much more attentive in class because they get plenty of sleep.

In 2036, high school students will be less stressed, will remember more of what they learn, and will get the proper amount of sleep. Standardized test will no longer be required, and schools will be focused on giving the most effective learning experience for the future working class.

(information in this article was obtained by Lenz, Bob. “How Will Technology Change Learning and Teaching?” 21 February 2011. edutopia. 27 September 2016. Levin, James. “A 2020 Vision: Education in the next two decades.” Quarterly Review od Distance Education (2002): 105-114.Thompson, Doug. “Brain power: five ways neuroscience will change education .” n.d. Our Kids. 27 September 2016.)

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